Sunday, June 05, 2016

Slow Sunday Stitching Needles

Welcome to Slow Sunday Stitching where we celebrate the art of hand stitching. If you enjoy holding a needle and thread in your hand, and you savour the experience of slowly creating something with your very own hands, you will enjoy the company of this international community of hand stitchers.
This is the needle I will be working with today. I am hand stitching the sashing on the back of my Swoon blocks (in a quilt-as-you-go style). This is a boring photo of grey fabric and thread, but it will be exciting to get at least two of these blocks sewn together today. And it will be one seam closer to becoming a finished quilt!
In her blog post last week Stephie wrote about the challenge of needle disposal. She said: "If you’re anything like me you’ll go through a hundred needles in the blink of an eye. Blunt. Bent. Snapped. Blunt needles are the bane of my quilting life." 
Yes... I can totally relate! I go through needles quickly and purchase several packages at a time so that I will never be without a sharp needle.
For years I have stored my dead, dull, broken and bent needles in this little glass jar. It has a cork lid and keeps all the sharps safe.
Kathleen Mary had a great suggestion for needle management. She takes her old needles to the Doctor's office where they can safely dispose of them in the sharps bucket. 

How do you deal with your needles?
Leave a comment or link up your blog post below and share your needle ideas.

   

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18 comments:

  1. Hello
    I have a drink can, prettied up with some fabric, that I put my bent/broken needles and pins in. I have been using the same can for about ten years. It's not looking like being full any time soon.

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  2. Enjoy your slow stitching today. Looking forward to seeing your Swoon quilt all finished.

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  3. I keep my broken/dull pins in a small bottle with a screw on lid. I have several, one beside the sewing machine, one in my bag that goes along to retreats. I try to make sure they are big enough to put old rotary blades in. It is surprising how many people have broken needles at retreats with no place to put them. I like the idea of taking them to the doctor's office to dispose of. I'll do that the next time I'm there. Blessings, Gretchen

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  4. I actually don't go through that many....maybe because I use quilting betweens for everything, applique included; not sure :)

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  5. I actually don't go through that many....maybe because I use quilting betweens for everything, applique included; not sure :)

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  6. I use a locking top MEDICATION BOTTLE from the pharmacy.. I save the larger ones we get and designate one for sharps.. once it is full it is safe to pitch in with the garbage bag and throw away safe for everyone! :)
    Not sure I will be blogging today so wanted to add my 2 cents in here!! Kathi

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  7. I keep empty prescription bottles to put my used needles and pins in. Then I can toss the whole container when full without injuring the garbage man!

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  8. Oh man, I need to look at my needles. I don't think I have ever even realized that some of my needles might no longer be sharp. I doubt that I have every discarded a needle.

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  9. As someone who works in a doctor office, you don't need to do this. I shudder to think what would happen if all our patients did this, as sharps disposal is not free for the office. Just put the needles in something small and plastic (like a prescription bottle as others have said) or tape it inside two pieces of cardboard.

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  10. A few years ago I started to practice a personal type of Hari Kuyo which is a Japanese festival dedicated to old and broken needles this 400-year-old ritual involves sticking old and broken needles into soft chunks of tofu as a way of showing thanks for their hard work. I suppose this tradition springs from the Eastern system of displaying gratitude towards objects that are a source of livelihood. It’s also about the many sorrows that women are believed to carry in their hearts, the burdens of which are passed on to the needles during many hours of sewing. So the needles do deserve a proper farewell and rest at the end of their service. Many Japanese women come to the festival not only to thank their needles, but also to pray for better kimono-making skills. Depending on the region it is celebrated either on December or February 8. I celebrate in February and store my bent and broken needles in a special felt pincushion until then.

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  11. I used to get Tic Tac's breath mints that came in a pop top type of little pack - open it drop you pin or needle in it and shut - when it is packed full tape it shut with duct tape and dispose. Also can use used prescription bottles - child proof tops could tape shut also to be double sure. I really do not go through needles really fast though and the container I have right now is several years old or more - I use Roxanne quilting betweens and applique needles and have little trouble with them.

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  12. I have a large empty prescription bottle that is the perfect size for needles and pins that need to be disposed of safely. It doesn't have the child-proof cap, so I can open it quickly - as opposed to not being able to open it at all if it's child proof LOL!!! Especially now that Rocky is in the house and always on the lookout for a stray pin, I have to be very careful about keeping them safely contained.

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  13. I don't seem to go through needles too fast. I use Roxanne's and maybe they are a strong needle?

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  14. Broken, bent needles are a real pain. I dispose of mine in a miniature jam jar and then just put them on the shelf with the others. Never managed to suss out what to do with them if I'm honest!

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  15. yesterday I broke a needle, and while I was removing it from the machine,and adding it to a plastic case where all broken and blind needles and pins where, I was thinking which will be the perfect discart for them. Very interisting you post about it today. No slow Sunday stitching for me today. Enjoy your hand stitching.

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  16. I store my old pins and needles between the floor boards in my quilt room. I have a special container for the staples I take out of freezer paper when preparing applique shapes. I probably should make sure it has a good lid on it.
    I bought several different packs of new pins in different shops in different places and have found way too many of them to be dull or worse, rusty! And I am having trouble finding those really fine, sharp silk pins with the clear yellow heads.

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  17. I must be odd, or perhaps unobservant, because I rarely seem to need new needles. Maybe I don't stitch enough, or maybe I don't notice when they're dull. I do occasionally bend a needle but if it's still sharp and doesn't hinder my stitching, I continue to use it until it becomes uncomfortable to use (or dull).

    When I break machine needles I put them in the recycle bin.

    Now I should probably go check all my needles to be sure they're really sharp!

    Thanks for hosting Slow Stitching Sunday, Kathy. I appreciate it.

    --Nancy. (ndmessier @ aol.com, joyforgrace.blogspot.com)

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  18. I have not used one consistent method for old and bent needle and pin disposal, but have gathered several ideas here. Thanks for beginning the discussion, Kathy! : )

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